The Pros And Cons Of New Construction Homes

Once you’re ready to buy a home, you probably have a pretty good idea of what you want. Should you buy a new construction home, or look for an existing one? Builders may refer to existing homes as “used.” This term makes them sound much less appealing. Truthfully, there are many advantages to both new and existing houses. 

Benefits Of New Homes

One of the most visible benefits of buying a new home is that it is untouched. The home is clean, and everything is sparkly new. You know that nothing in the house needs to be repaired. That is one of the most significant incentives to buy a new construction home. Having no repairs offsets some of the typical costs that homeowners incur once they buy. 

Latest Technology And Amenities

One of the other benefits of new homes is that they are not dated. You’ll have access to all of the latest technologies and amenities in a new construction home. The home will be energy efficient which will save you some money on utilities. You’ll have all of the technological comforts that you need in order to keep your devices charged and your in-home entertainment on point.

You May Be Able To Select Features


If you do buy a new construction, often, you’ll have the option to choose the details of the home. Some key features, colors, and styles will be in your control, so you can’t complain about them once you move in! 

Less Competition

There may be less competition for a new home. This is because most new homes are present in neighborhoods that are just being built. All the home on the street are most likely vacant, so people looking for new construction have a lot to choose from in one area.  

The Cons To New Construction 

Although buying new construction sounds fantastic, there are a few drawbacks. First, you’re pretty much relegated to one location- wherever the new homes are being built which is generally on a new street full of new homes. The area is essential especially when it comes to your home’s value increasing over time. Many times, new construction homes are built by the same construction company. All of the houses on the street look the same, and there may be little differentiation between them other than the color. If you’re someone who likes variety, this is something to consider.

Keep in mind that you can always buy an existing home that may be less expensive than new construction and do whatever it takes to make it your own. This is a practical option for many people. Your options may be a bit fewer if you do decide to look for new construction homes, so it’s good to go into the home buying process with an open mind as to all the possibilities that are available.         

Tips for Buying Home Appliances

Your household appliances are among those most expensive items in your home. If you’re looking to buy or sell a house having modern, stainless steel appliances can improve the aesthetic and increase the value of a home. If you’re thinking about replacing old appliances, this guide will show you how to find the best deals without sacrificing quality.

Plan ahead

Many of us are of the mindset that we’ll think about replacing appliances once they no longer work. This approach, however, leaves no time for planning and searching for the best deals. If your refrigerator stops working you don’t want to end up walking around an appliance store at the mercy of their prices and selection, trying to buy a new one before the meat in your freezer thaws.

Stay updated. If it’s time to start thinking about replacing an appliance, give yourself time to look for deals. Sign up for email lists from appliance stores or set up price-drop alerts on sites like Amazon.

Find the right brand. Even if you don’t buy your appliances online, you should use the internet to find the right brand for your needs. Compare their models and prices so you’ll know what to look out for when waiting for a good deal.

Read the reviews. Your best friend when shopping for new appliances will be the customers who leave reviews of their experience on sites like Amazon and Best Buy. If an appliance is on sale at a great price but the reviews are poor, you might know why the company is trying to get rid of them quickly.

Read the fine print

If you’re buying online, make sure you carefully read the shipping and returns policy. With a purchase as expensive as a washer or dryer, you want to make sure you know exactly how much you’ll be paying.

When it comes to guaranteeing the performance and lifespan of your appliances, there are protection plans offered by the store, manufacturer warranties, and even third-party companies who provide appliance insurance. Compare various stores’ protection plans and various manufacturers’ warranties to see which one fits your budget but also provides the best protection.

Get your timing right

Like any industry, the appliance industry operates on a calendar of new model releases and sales on older models. Around September and October companies tend to unveil their latest models and lower prices on the older models.

To beat other deal hunters, shop on Thursday. That’s the day many stores mark down sale items for the weekend rush. But you’ll get there first.

There are a number of holiday sales that stores participate in as well, such as Memorial Day, Labor Day, and President’s Day. And, of course, there are the hectic Black Friday sales.

Don’t judge a book by its cover

When it comes to appliances, appearance isn’t everything. Manufacturers often try to up the appeal of appliances by giving them colorful paint jobs or other aesthetic features that don’t affect the function of the appliance.

 

Now that you know how to get the best deals start searching and comparing prices. Don’t forget to use the powers of negotiation and price-matching, and go find the home appliance of your dreams.

 

Another Property Sold – 272 Lincoln Street Hingham, MA

This Single-Family in Hingham, MA recently sold for $440,000. This Colonial style home was sold by Donna Geihe – KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY.








272 Lincoln Street,



Hingham, MA 02043

Single-Family

$450,000
Price

$440,000
Sale Price

8
Rooms

4
Beds

1
Baths

Over 2000 SQ FT FOR 450K! A TREASURE N A PERFECT LOCATION! One Mile to Downtown Hingham and One Mile to the Shipyard and Commuter Boat. Be Enchanted by this English Cottage Styled Home Built of Stone That Was Once a Gate-House to the Peter Bradley Estate. This is not a Cookie Cutter – it's a Home for the Artist, Handy Person, Contractor, One who Appreciates Time Gone By and Who Has the Aptitude to Visualize and Take Pleasure in Modernizing this Beauty While Appreciating its Unique Character and History. Well Maintained-Just Needs Updating. Seize This Opportunity to Own a One of a Kind Property in a very Desired Part of Town, Current Owners have Lived Here for 53 Years – Now it's Time for New Memories to be Made.

Similar Properties

Confused By Credit Scores?

Your credit score impacts many of your important life decisions. From your ability to open new credit cards, to taking out loans for cars and houses, your credit will be checked by many companies throughout your life.

Credit scores are mostly a mystery to the people who have them. Sure, you can check your credit score for free online, but when it comes to understanding your score, most consumers are in the dark.

In a perfect world, we would be taught in high school and college exactly what goes into your credit score, how to build credit, and how to avoid credit missteps. Unfortunately, we don’t live in that world and many of us don’t find out what makes up a credit score until we’re in debt from student loans or credit cards.

In this article,  we’ll teach you what a credit score is, what it consists of, and how it is affected by your financial decisions. And, we’ll do it in an easy-to-understand way that skips all of the jargon and acronyms that are used by banks and lenders. Read on to learn everything you need to know about your credit score.

What is a credit score?

Simply put, your credit score tells lenders how safe it is to lend money to you, i.e., the likeliness of you paying back your debt to them. In the United States, credit scores are awarded by three major companies. Since they use slightly different methods of scoring your credit, your score can vary slightly between them. What they all have in common, however, is that they put together your score based on your financial history (or lack thereof). How do they come about your score?

Parts of a credit score

Think of an Olympic diver who just took a perfect dive. The judges off to the side are going to score her on a few different factors: her approach, her flight, and her entry into the water. They’ll award her a number based on her dive and then those numbers are averaged to give her a score.

Credit is scored in a similar way. You aren’t judged just based on your payments or just based on how long you’ve had a credit card. Rather, you’re judged based on a combination of five main things. For your FICO score (the score used by the majority of banks and lenders) those are:

  • 35% – payment history
  • 30% – current debt
  • 15% – how long you’ve had credit
  • 10% – types of credit
  • 10% – new credit

As you can see, the most important factors that make up your credit score revolve around how much you owe and if you pay your bills on time. Having high amounts of debt or credit cards that are maxed out (meaning you hit the spending limit), your score can be lowered. Similarly, your score can be lowered every time you miss a bill payment. However, if you do miss a payment and your score is lowered, it can be recovered by making on-time payments.

Your credit score is also influenced by the length of your credit history (15%): when you opened your first credit card or took out your first loan. The longer you’ve been making on-time payments the better.

The last two factors that make up your score are the types of credit you have (10%) and new credit (10%). Having many different types of credit (home loan, credit card, student loan, auto loan, etc.) will improve your score so long as you’re making on-time payments. However, opening up new credit rapidly is a red flag for lenders that you might be in financial trouble, hurting your score.