Clean Your House The Safe Way

Keeping your home clean shows that you care about where you live. Despite your best efforts,without realizing it, while doing deep cleanings, you may use household cleaners that could be hazardous to your health. Many of these products have safety labels on them. You could save yourself and your family a visit to an emergency room simply by reading and following the usage directions on the container.

Clean your home safely

Other household cleaners may be products that you have used for years. The cleaners may have been used in your family for generations. But, that doesn’t mean that the products are always safe. In fact, hazards associated with products that you may use while cleaning your home range from minor to acute.

  • Acidic products and bleaches should be used while wearing gloves. Household cleaners made with corrosive chemicals should also be used while wearing gloves.
  • Bleach based household cleaners can be harmful to young lungs and skin. Open windows when using these products. Leave the room and get some fresh air if you start to feel congested or a burning sensation in your eyes or lungs.
  • Strong fragrances or scents in household cleaning products can irritate your respiratory system. Companies that make cleaning products don’t always reveal all the chemicals in their products. Pay attention to how you feel when using certain household products. Stop using products if you start to feel ill.
  • Products that contain chemicals like nitrites,carcinogens and diethanolamines could take years to show their effects. However,long term effects of these cleaners could help to create acute or chronic illnesses.
  • Steel scrubbers can chip, cut and damage your hands. Wear gloves when scrubbing with steel scrubs. Change the gloves if the scrubs start to tear the gloves. To protect your hands, also toss steel scrubs in the trash when the scrubs start to break down. Hard cleaning agents can speed up the breakdown of steel scrubs.

Plant based household cleaning products may be safer. Avoid mixing cleaners as a chemical in one cleaner could become toxic if combined with a chemical in another cleaner. As often as it is said, it is worth repeating – keep household cleaners (even if you deem them to be safe) out of the reach of children.

Teach children not to open the tops on products. Also, ensure cleaners that you bring into your home have a childproof cap or seal on them. When using cleaners, wipe appliances, counter tops and other areas dry before leaving the area. You may even decide to do heavy cleanings while your children are visiting relatives or outside playing.

Fresh scents can masks corrosive and other harmful chemicals in household cleaners. Before using products, including household cleaners that you’ve used for years, read safety warnings on the labeling. Open doors and windows as needed and take breaks between cleanings to avoid inhaling too much of any cleaner at once.Consult your physician if you or your child becomes ill after coming into contact with a household cleaner.

Planning for Money Milestones

In the course of a lifetime people encounter many money milestones. It can be difficult at times to know what to do with our money when we go through significant changes in life. Here are some of the major money milestones people encounter:

Marriage: According to TheKnot.com, Americans spend an average of $27,000 on a wedding. So vow not to start off your marriage in debt. Curb spending on the big day by cutting expenses where possible.

Buying a Home: Experts recommend saving for a 20% down payment for a home. Make sure to shop for a home loan and plan to spend no more than 30% of your taxable income on housing.

Starting a Family: The average cost of raising a child is $235,000, not including college. Plan your household costs to increase 10 to 20% with the addition of a baby.

Getting a Divorce: Divorce is expensive. Build a team of professionals who are knowledgeable about the implications of divorce, you will need a lawyer, accountant and financial advisor.

Retirement: 56% of Americans ages 18 to 34 aren’t saving for retirement. Take advantage of your employer’s 401(k) or other sponsored retirement plan. A good plan is to save five percent of your income.

 

Things You Must Disclose When Selling A Home

Honesty is the best policy when you’re selling your home. There can be messy legal consequences when it comes to not disclosing problems contained within your home. If you’re unsure if you should disclose something, you probably should reveal it. Legally, here’s what you’ll need to be concerned about in your home as a seller:

A Death On The Property

Some would refer to these as “emotional defects.” A murder, suicide or violent crime occurred on the property most likely needs to be disclosed. If a death is more than 3 years old, it may not need to be discussed. If a buyer asks about it however, even crimes that occurred on the property more than 3 years ago must be exposed. 

The Use Of Lead Paint 

This is a must when it comes to seller disclosures. Any homes built before 1978 must have a lead paint disclosure signed. This is a federal law that applies to every state. Even if lead paint has been removed, the former presence of it must be revealed. If you are completely unaware of lead paint issues, you aren’t legally required to provide the information. In this area, it’s best to be honest.   

Got Ghosts? 

There truly is no disclosure too big or too small when it comes to selling your home. You may not think of paranormal activity as something you must reveal, but everything is important. If you believe your house is haunted or if an exorcism has been done to the home, buyers should know about it. Many states have laws that include the obligation to disclose all known facts about a home. Even if you think it’s a silly issue, it could be important to discuss with potential buyers.

Property Drainage Issues 

If your basement gets flooded or your backyard gets standing water, you need to expose that in the disclosure. Even if you believe an issue has been fixed, adding what has been done to documents can help to save you legal trouble later on. If you believe an issue has been resolved, at least the buyer has the information on hand as to what they might expect.

Unwanted Houseguests

Sellers are required by law to disclose any pest issue or infestation. Any types of creatures that have been found in the home like bedbugs, snakes, mice, or bats are an issue that must be shown on the disclosure. Even if the building has had the pests but you have not personally seen them, it’s a good idea to tell buyers about it to cover yourself.

Disputes With Neighbors


It’s wise to disclose neighborly disputes with potential buyers. This is especially true if it involves your property lines and fences. Even small issues can become big ones, so it’s always best to reveal them upfront.     

Conducting A Title Search

Conducting Title Research is a long meticulous adventure and best left to the professionals. If you opt to do this research yourself, you can usually find most property records online.

Locate the property that interests you and determine whether the property is registered or recorded. If you do not know, you must search both databases. Look for the current owner and enter his /her information. Find the current owners current deed. Make sure the property has been properly transferred. Search the current deed for book and page number. Write this information down.

Now search the registry using the both the book and page number. Be sure to review those back records (approximately 50 years back) and make sure all liens have been properly discharged.

Once you have the records in front of you, check to see if the current deed/current owner has transferred the property. If there are any probate issues, federal or state liens, and/or outstanding mortgages that could affect your title to the property you will need to go back to the original lien holder and obtain a discharge.